Open Access Material

Compliance Measurement Sheet

This is a simple Excel sheet that I developed 30 years ago to measure patient compliance with a prescribed exercise program. I collected data for maybe a year and achieved about 80% compliance.

I used to print out a sheet of paper with the table on both sides. That gave the patient two weeks of measurement capacity and I would see the patient at the end of that period to analyze compliance.


Nowadays this could probably be provided as a document on a smart phone, or there may already be an app that can be used or adapted to achieve a more contemporary user friendliness.


I never did this in a way to collect data as research and so the results are not published. It would be a simple research project for beginning researchers though. You may copy this form and use it. I don’t expect any formal recognition, but a simple acknowledgement of the idea would be nice, should data be accumulated and results published.

 

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How to survive the medical misinformation mess

This is an important article for clincians and patients alike.

Abstract 

Most physicians and other healthcare professionals are unaware of the pervasiveness of poor quality clinical evidence that contributes considerably to overuse, underuse, avoidable adverse events, missed opportunities for right care and wasted healthcare resources. The Medical Misinformation Mess comprises four key problems. First, much published medical research is not reliable or is of uncertain reliability, offers no benefit to patients, or is not useful to decision makers. Second, most healthcare professionals are not aware of this problem. Third, they also lack the skills necessary to evaluate the reliability and usefulness of medical evidence. Finally, patients and families frequently lack relevant, accurate medical evidence and skilled guidance at the time of medical decision-making. Increasing the reliability of available, published evidence may not be an imminently reachable goal. Therefore, efforts should focus on making healthcare professionals, more sensitive to the limitations of the evidence, training them to do critical appraisal, and enhancing their communication skills so that they can effectively summarize and discuss medical evidence with patients to improve decision-making. Similar efforts may need to target also patients, journalists, policy makers, the lay public and other healthcare stakeholders.

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Back pain diagnosis: Child’s Play!

This brief 18 minute video is intentionally provocative and presented with tongue-in-cheek to a degree. The intention is to grab your attention and address a commonly held belief that diagnosis of the source and cause of low back pain is inherently complex and difficult. Though good content knowledge is required, the basic principles whereby the source and cause of back pain may be deduced is rather simple. A well-known child’s game is used as an analogy to make the point that ordinary clinicians can diagnose most back pain cases, and the skill may be learned, given the information and simple methods provided in the course. Three examples of real patients are used to illustrate the method.”Note – add an extra line immediately after the embedded video.

 

 

Laslett Lecture July 16 2017 PNZ conference Auckland The Dynamic pelvis

Laslett Lecture July 16 2017 PNZ conference Auckland The Dynamic pelvis

Lecture given to "The Dynamic Pelvis" seminar July 16 2017 in Auckland, New Zealand. This seminar was arranged by the Auckland and North Shore branches of Physiotherapy New Zealand.

CONSORT, STARD & TRIPOD

The websites below have important information on the proper standards for report and conducting Randomized Controlled Trials (The CONSORT statement), Diagnostic accuracy studies (The STARD Inititiative) and Diagnostic Predictive Models (TRIPOD)

here are the links to the respective websites:

CONSORT: http://www.consort-statement.org/

STARD Initiative: http://www.equator-network.org/reporting-guidelines/stard/

TRIPOD: https://www.tripod-statement.org/

Documents on study design, flow diagrams and standards for reporting are available from these websites and you can access the relevant free, open access papers as well