Sacroiliac Joint and PGP Course

Sacroiliac Joint and PGP Course

This course focuses on pain arising from the sacroiliac region rather than the lumbar spine. Another term in common usage is pelvic girdle pain or PGP. PGP refers to the symptoms, whereas sacroiliac joint pain refers to pain whose nociceptive source is the sacroiliac joint. The great majority of patients classified as PGP have a sacroiliac joint source of pain. Lumbosacral pain and sacroiliac joint pain are often similar in location and behave in ways that are very similar.

*Prerequisites - First Activities and Introduction Course, Principles of Clinical Diagnosis Course and Radicular Syndrome Course. 

 

 

This course focuses on the diagnosis of intra-articular sacroiliac pain and makes a clear distinction between that, and the concept of sacroiliac joint dysfunction. The two terms should never be used interchangeably at all. Sacroiliac joint pain is a verifiable and testable phenomenon that patients report, whereas sacroiliac joint dysfunction is an hypothesis regarding altered or pathological function regarding movement or position. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is an unreliable and outdated diagnosis that has no place in modern musculoskeletal medicine. Intra-articular sacroiliac joint pain is a real issue that can be diagnosed clinically, and using controlled anaesthetic blocks. Sacroiliac joint pain may affect people of all ages, but is most common among women during and after pregnancy, young males and females affected by spondyloarthropathy, and those people suffering significant pelvic trauma.

There are two lessons in the course. 

  • The first looks at the anatomy and biomechanics of the pelvis and sacroiliac joint to provide a solid understanding of movement, stability and the concepts of  form and force closure.
  • The second lesson looks specifically at sacroiliac joint pain, how the clinical assessment is used to make the diagnosis, and how that compares to the reference standard of guided single and controlled intra-articular blocks. The published evidence underpinning this assessment is covered in detail.

There are several case study videos

  • A full assessment of a young woman with spondyloarthropathy. 
  • The sacroiliac joint tests are described and shown in considerable detail so the variations in the direction and amount of pressure used is clear. 
  • There is a link to a public domain lecture on the SIJ that is worth watching as well.

There is a significant reading list and a quiz to test your understanding of the material.

*Prerequisites - First Activities and Introduction Course, Principles of Clinical Diagnosis Course and Radicular Syndrome Course. 

Study time: 4hrs (approx.)

Duration: 30 days
Price: NZ$98.00